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Clothes

For the Christian hipster with money, choosing the right clothing is of utmost importance. After all, with scads of expendable income, you're finally able to score that selvage denim from the Japanese mill whose sustainable practices and ardent commitment to quality justify the $300 pricetag. Steep, sure, but can you really put a price on scoring your own Surface2Air x Kings of Leon collection fedora? Apparently, you can. And it's £180,00.

 

 


Kitschy Sacred Heart of Jesus Art Print

Christian hipsters love Jesus kitsch. And sometimes even sincerely. Rather than hide from it or be ashamed of it, they embrace it. It's Jesus, after all. He can't be ruined by cheesy art. It's not uncommon to find a somewhat Catholic-y portrait of Christ adorning the walls or bookshelves of a hipster abode. A painting like this says, "Yeah, this Jesus is more Danish than Jewish, and yeah, he does double condition his shimmering curly brown locks. Get over it."

Criterion Collection DVDs and Box Sets

Once Christian hipsters enter a certain income bracket, they can begin to proudly amass a respectable collection of Criterion Collection DVDs (usually around $30-$40 for single DVDs), preferably encompassing several French New Wave films, a few Ozu masterpieces, and the collected work of Krzysztof Kieslowski (or any other difficultly named, little known foreign director).

 

Highbrow Books/DVDs

Always looking to showcase their elitist, non-mainstream, educated tastes in media, the well-heeled Christian hipsters commonly have books and DVDs lying around, purposefully arranged in a "lived in" manner. You might find a few N.T. Wright books, some Dostoevsky/Lewis/Chesterton, and probably the Mad Men or Twin Peaks DVDs.

ESV Study Bible and Assorted Magazines

Since it debuted in 2008, the ESV Study Bible has been remarkably popular among college students, seminarians, and even the occasional feminist Christian unaware of the translation's strong complementarian stances. Elegantly designed and available in plenty of expensive forms of animal hide, this Bible—created by a team of 95 evangelical scholars—is a great resource for any Christian wanting to go deeper in their faith. It also doubles nicely as a paperweight or display base for decorative crosses.

 

On top of the Bible are some decidedly "Christian hipster" magazines, including Sojourners, Paste, Relevant, and Neue. Christian hipsters can also be spotted reading things like Christianity Today, Books & Culture, Risen, McSweeneys, GQ, Vice, V, W, The Economist, Harper's, The Atlantic, Vanity Fair, The Onion, and the alternative weekly of their respective metropolis.

 

iPhone

You think your Blackberry can size up the muscular Texting-as-a-lifestyle iPhone juggernaut without yelping in defeat, only to retreat with its telecommuting tail between its legs? You're obviously a PC user. Listen up, Plebeians: if you want a leg to stand on in this tech-savvy society, you'd better get yourself to AT&T with a wad of cash and sign your life away. Because when it comes to surfing the tech trend wave, none of those non-Apple grommets even come close to the mighty iPhone.

Clothes

For the Christian hipster with money, choosing the right clothing is of utmost importance. After all, with scads of expendable income, you're finally able to score that selvage denim from the Japanese mill whose sustainable practices and ardent commitment to quality justify the $300 pricetag. Steep, sure, but can you really put a price on scoring your own Surface2Air x Kings of Leon collection fedora? Apparently, you can. And it's £180,00.

 

 


Fancy Speciality Coffee

Being into coffee is not exactly "set me apart from the pack" cool; but being in to coffee that is shade-grown, single-origin, third-wave, and/or made from $50/lb beans... now that is something a hipster could get excited about. They love drinking Joe from places like Intelligentsia (Chicago, L.A.), Stumptown (Portland), or anywhere that casually evokes the Lynchian ambiance of Twin Peaks (but with WIFI).

 

Classy Vices

Liquor: For the hipster with money, nothing betrays a more quotidian and embarrassing lack of social hierarchy than saddling up to that new bar in the emerging downtown scene - the one with all the dim lighting who staffs "mixologists" instead of bartenders - and (eep!) ordering a Vodka Redbull. Thanks to a resurgence in the classic art of drink making (and, in large part, to Don Draper's stonily clefted chin), Hipsters with expendable income are investing in finely crafted spirits with which to mix their Manhattans and Old Fashioneds.

 

Flask: Long the terrain of Clint Eastwood, John Wayne, and other western gunslingers, the flask has made a triumphant comeback in recent years among hipster n'er-do-wells hellbent on looking rebellious by carrying whiskey on their person at all times. Christian hipsters--having newly discovered hard liquor and finding it an utter blessing--are not exempt from this trend.

 

Pipe: Nothing spells seminary student or C.S. Lewis junkie like a good old-fashioned pipe. Particularly popular with philosophically inclined men who prefer Plato, Aquinas, and Augustine over French existentialism (fans of Sarte and Camus just smoke cigarettes), pipe smoking is a great "every now and then" hobby to accompany late-night drinking with friends or solitary devotional reading on a crisp November morning.

Monk-Oriented Beer

Because they never experienced frat keggers, high school drinking parties and/or beer pong, Christian hipsters usually forgo the cheap domestic brews in their beer coming-of-age, instead jumping straight in to imports (Heineken or Guinness is usually their first "favorite"), gradually refining their tastes by visiting microbreweries, hipster bars, or the United Kingdom. By the time they hit 30, most Christian hipsters are beer snobs. Some make their own beer, others pair beers to their food (a Rogue Shakespeare Stout complements bread pudding with hazelnuts and salt caramel quite nicely), and others regularly attend beer tastings. Though their parents probably frown upon such heathen pleasures, these Christian hipsters likely attend churches where the pastor has a beer belly and Sierra Nevada brews are regularly consumed at small groups. "But mom, Christian monks at Trappist monasteries make beer to support their mission! I'm just supporting God's kingdom!" Whether or not anyone actually uses this argument to sway skeptical parents is debatable. But the deliciousness of a Chimay Red at a summertime church beach barbecue is indisputably a high pleasure of Christian hipster existence.

The Monied Yuppies

Typically in their late 20s or early 30s, the Monied Yuppies are the types of Christian hipsters that gladly open their well-appointed homes for house churches or small groups (serving expensive wine or whiskey cocktails for each such occasion). More established in their tastes and less susceptible to fickle trends, these arts-patrons will not hesitate to pony up $100 to see Sufjan Stevens play Carnegie Hall. They eat well, drink well, love concerts, and attend churches with Vegan options at potlucks. More than likely they've thrown a Mad Men 60s-themed party or been involved in a discussion group for a book by Donald Miller, G.K. Chesterton or N.T. Wright. Gleefully at home in Anthopologie or Crate and Barrel, these stylish hipsters are highly recruited by the pastors of wannabe hip churches seeking young, culturally-savvy congregations that also have money to tithe.